What Tie Width Should I Wear?

A guide to which tie widths
are trending and what width is best for you





Written by Harold Murrell

We know the struggle. Trends
change. Style norms shift. As frustrating as it may be, tie width is no
exception. For the modern man who wants to stay on-trend, it’s important to
move with the ebb and flow of the fashion tide. But don’t worry, we’re here to
keep your head above the proverbial waters.
So what tie width is currently
in style? Here’s the simple answer: Any width between 2.25” and 3.25”.
This is the safe zone. Any
wider or narrower and you’re at risk of looking like you’re living in the past
(or the future?). With that in mind, there are a few considerations to be made
when deciding what width is right for you.
CONSIDER YOUR BODY TYPE

black-and-white-man-in-tie
Slim / Skinny Men
We recommend — 2.25”- 2.75”

Men with small chests and
narrow torsos should wear narrower-width ties. Why? A wide tie on a skinny guy
will look a lot wider than it would on a man of significant girth. For this
reason, we recommend seeking out slim ties between 2.25” and 2.75”.
While it’s a bit more daring,
a 2.0” tie can also look great on slender gent—just bear in mind that it may
look a bit retro to some, and a bit “hipster” to others.
Average / Athletic Men
We recommend — 2.25”- 3.25”

If you’re an average guy with
an average to athletic build, the world is your oyster. Feel free to wear any
tie from our recommended range of 2.25” to 3.25”. Exactly what you end up
choosing comes down to personal taste. Wider ties tend to have a conservative,
classic appeal. In contrast, narrower ties exude a youthful, trendy charm.
Broad / Large Men
We recommend — 2.75”- 3.25”

Wider guys require wider ties.
If you’ve got the chest of a professional bodybuilder or the belly of a sumo
wrestler, super skinny ties can look a bit comical on your substantial frame.
We recommend selecting a tie
that is between 2.75” and 3.25” in width. It’s possible to wear a tie as wide
as 3.5” but anything wider has the risk of looking like you raided Grandad’s
closet. That doesn’t mean you should toss your extra-wide ties in the trash.
Push them to the back of your wardrobe for now—chances are the extra wide trend
will be back in vogue in a few short years.
CONSIDER YOUR LAPEL WIDTH

three-men-in-suits-match-tie-width-and-lapel-width
Lapels are the folded flaps of
cloth on the front of a jacket or coat. And like the waxing and waning width of
the necktie, so goes the ever-evolving suit lapel.
Why does lapel width matter?
Because a man should always attempt to match the width of his tie to the width
of his lapel. Wearing a wide tie with narrow lapels or a narrow tie with wide
lapels can throw your body proportions off-kilter. That’s not a good thing.
Fashion designers are a restless
bunch, pushing us forward into unexplored territory, pulling us back toward
styles of the past, and bucking the trends of the day. The recent shift away
from narrow lapels and the resurgence of wider lapels are great examples of
this phenomenon. The point is, when you get a new suit, you may need to adjust
your tie collection to match.
PRO TIP: Don’t wear
super-skinny ties with a double-breasted jacket regardless of your lapel width.
LIVE WIDTH-OUT FEAR

skinny-tie-standard-tie-wide-tie-stacked
No tie is perfect for every
man, at every hour, and in every situation.The width you choose should be
something that you’re comfortable with and confident wearing. Thanks to the
ease of online shopping, there is no good excuse not to educate yourself and experiment.
Any width tie you desire is but a few clicks away. (Did someone say free
shipping and returns?)
NOTE: It’s inevitable that tie
width trends will continue to shift over time. As such, we’ll be keeping this
article updated regularly. If you sense a disturbance in the necktie force,
check back for updates on the current zeitgeist.
And remember…
yoda-tie-meme
Harold Murrell
SOURCE:
THE GENTLEMANUAL
Kayode Ojo
Kayode Emmanuel Ojo is the Co-Founder and Managing Director at SHEFFA Limited. He is presently studying Computer Science at the National Open University, Victoria Island, Lagos.